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Dbn supplies lighting for Sound To Sea event

Lighting and rigging specialists dbn helped create ‘Sound To Sea’, a night-time nautical show to celebrate Glasgow-based arts organisation Cryptic’s 20th anniversary. 

Dbn’s Stephen Page was commissioned to design and develop a lighting scheme for the show, due to the company’s extensive experience working on dynamic outdoor multi-faceted performances like this. 

The performance encompassed several live artists and bands, aerialists, pyro effects, around 140 performers and no less than fourteen ships which were part of a magical kinetic set, some moving around the dock during the performance. 

The scale of the site was huge – from the top of the Science Centre roof, where the aerialists performed, to the boats maneuvering in the dock, reaching right along to Glasgow Tower at the end of the Science Centre, which became a striking end-stop to the action, with carefully choreographed pyro sequences fired in and around it. 

“It was a really exhilarating project to be involved in,” Page said, “brought to fruition by a lot of hard work and some touches of pure ingenuity to overcome many challenges and idiosyncratic scenarios – which is what we like. There was a great team spirit and vibe between everyone working on site, the shows were both fully attended (by around 4,000 people) and it was a great success.”

Photo credit: Tommy Ga Ken Wwan


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Dbn supplies lighting for Sound To Sea event

Lighting and rigging specialists dbn helped create ‘Sound To Sea’, a night-time nautical show to celebrate Glasgow-based arts organisation Cryptic’s 20th anniversary. 

Dbn’s Stephen Page was commissioned to design and develop a lighting scheme for the show, due to the company’s extensive experience working on dynamic outdoor multi-faceted performances like this. 

The performance encompassed several live artists and bands, aerialists, pyro effects, around 140 performers and no less than fourteen ships which were part of a magical kinetic set, some moving around the dock during the performance. 

The scale of the site was huge – from the top of the Science Centre roof, where the aerialists performed, to the boats maneuvering in the dock, reaching right along to Glasgow Tower at the end of the Science Centre, which became a striking end-stop to the action, with carefully choreographed pyro sequences fired in and around it. 

“It was a really exhilarating project to be involved in,” Page said, “brought to fruition by a lot of hard work and some touches of pure ingenuity to overcome many challenges and idiosyncratic scenarios – which is what we like. There was a great team spirit and vibe between everyone working on site, the shows were both fully attended (by around 4,000 people) and it was a great success.”

Photo credit: Tommy Ga Ken Wwan


Got a story for 
Access All Areas? Email Emma Hudson
Follow us @Access_AA
Or on Facebook and Instagram