DF Concerts comply with RSPB guidelines for T In The Park

Following an osprey nesting discovery on the new site of T In The Park, DF Concerts – the event’s organisers – have complied with the RSPB’s guidelines.

The future of T In The Park wa calledinto question earlier this week after a flock of ospreys returned to the proposed site of T in the Park festival at Strathallan Castle. 

Festival organisers DF Concerts hopes the ospreys will settle at a new nest further away from the festival site, but accepted that the old nest was now “active”.

A spokesperson for RSPB Scotland (Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Scotland) told Access that DF are complying with the guidelines it has formed, but stressed that wildlife protection should be a priority for any outdoor event organiser.

Police were called to the site on Monday and are monitoring the protected species.

DF Concerts originally hoped the birds would return to a specially-constructed new nest further away from the festival site.

A spokesman for RSPB Scotland said: “DF Concerts have accepted our position that the old osprey nest has now become active and have withdrawn the cherry picker. This old nest is closer to the T in the Park event arena and the risk of disturbance to the birds is therefore higher.

“If the birds do settle and nest here it doesn’t necessarily preclude T in the Park happening, but it does make it much more challenging to accommodate without risk of causing a disturbance to the birds.

“Whether the festival will go ahead is yet to be determined, and it is still the subject of a live planning application. However, RSPB Scotland will continue to work with all parties to see if any contingencies might be available to allow the event to proceed and for the birds to be given the required space and freedom they require so they will enjoy a successful breeding season.”

T In The Park’s line-up includes The Prodigy, Kasabian, The Libertines and Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds.

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DF Concerts comply with RSPB guidelines for T In The Park

Following an osprey nesting discovery on the new site of T In The Park, DF Concerts – the event’s organisers – have complied with the RSPB’s guidelines.

The future of T In The Park wa calledinto question earlier this week after a flock of ospreys returned to the proposed site of T in the Park festival at Strathallan Castle. 

Festival organisers DF Concerts hopes the ospreys will settle at a new nest further away from the festival site, but accepted that the old nest was now “active”.

A spokesperson for RSPB Scotland (Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Scotland) told Access that DF are complying with the guidelines it has formed, but stressed that wildlife protection should be a priority for any outdoor event organiser.

Police were called to the site on Monday and are monitoring the protected species.

DF Concerts originally hoped the birds would return to a specially-constructed new nest further away from the festival site.

A spokesman for RSPB Scotland said: “DF Concerts have accepted our position that the old osprey nest has now become active and have withdrawn the cherry picker. This old nest is closer to the T in the Park event arena and the risk of disturbance to the birds is therefore higher.

“If the birds do settle and nest here it doesn’t necessarily preclude T in the Park happening, but it does make it much more challenging to accommodate without risk of causing a disturbance to the birds.

“Whether the festival will go ahead is yet to be determined, and it is still the subject of a live planning application. However, RSPB Scotland will continue to work with all parties to see if any contingencies might be available to allow the event to proceed and for the birds to be given the required space and freedom they require so they will enjoy a successful breeding season.”

T In The Park’s line-up includes The Prodigy, Kasabian, The Libertines and Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds.

Got a story for Access All Areas? Email Tom Hall
Follow us @Access_AA
Or on Facebook and Instagram
Read the latest Access All Areas here.