Firing Up Battersea Power Station

London-based Projection Advertising’s 3D video-mapping spectacular to promote Bear Grylls’ television series Escape From Hell hit the headlines when virtual flames at Battersea Power Station inspired a 999 call.

The fire-themed projection was augmented by pyrotechnics and was part of a larger launch event organised by Discovery Networks International, where clips from the new series were screened to 500 guests. 

Starting with the power station’s chimneys apparently catching fire, the projection went on to depict flames gradually engulfing the building. Sections of brickwork appeared to crumble until the insides of the chimneys could clearly be seen. The real Bear Grylls then rappelled down the building to safety before it finally burst into flames, which was too much for one spectator.

“We attended and as soon as we got there we realised it wasn’t an incident for us,” a fire service spokesman told the BBC. “But we take every call seriously.”

“Video-mapping is all about augmenting surfaces to such a degree of realism that people are left wondering what was real and what was digital, something that we definitely achieved with this project!” Tom Burch, MD of Projection Advertising said.

“We’re always pushing the boundaries to create the most spectacular and believable effects possible, and using actual pyrotechnics alongside the projection plus the real-life Bear Grylls helped us to blur those boundaries particularly effectively.”

A video of the event can be seen here

Firing Up Battersea Power Station

London-based Projection Advertising’s 3D video-mapping spectacular to promote Bear Grylls’ television series Escape From Hell hit the headlines when virtual flames at Battersea Power Station inspired a 999 call.

The fire-themed projection was augmented by pyrotechnics and was part of a larger launch event organised by Discovery Networks International, where clips from the new series were screened to 500 guests. 

Starting with the power station’s chimneys apparently catching fire, the projection went on to depict flames gradually engulfing the building. Sections of brickwork appeared to crumble until the insides of the chimneys could clearly be seen. The real Bear Grylls then rappelled down the building to safety before it finally burst into flames, which was too much for one spectator.

“We attended and as soon as we got there we realised it wasn’t an incident for us,” a fire service spokesman told the BBC. “But we take every call seriously.”

“Video-mapping is all about augmenting surfaces to such a degree of realism that people are left wondering what was real and what was digital, something that we definitely achieved with this project!” Tom Burch, MD of Projection Advertising said.

“We’re always pushing the boundaries to create the most spectacular and believable effects possible, and using actual pyrotechnics alongside the projection plus the real-life Bear Grylls helped us to blur those boundaries particularly effectively.”

A video of the event can be seen here