Icy conditions for De Boer at FIS Ski Championships

De Boer’s tent builders battled minus 20°C for their first event of 2015, the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Falun, Sweden. 

The De Boer team were there to construct hospitality pavilions for Audi, Ericsson, and Vattenfall, as well as structures for dressing rooms, information points, stages for local culture demonstrations, TV studios, and other exhibitors. 

They also built a 1,600sqm pavilion that housed the special exhibition ‘Innovation We Trust’, run by Mindustry and MCI Scandinavia. 

The Championships ran from 18 February to 1 March, with exceptionally icy temperatures challenging the De Boer team. 

“Our structures had to be continually heated so that any snowfall on the roof melted, and therefore not allowed to compromise the integrity of the structure due to increased weight loading,” said De Boer’s senior site supervisor Gavin Scheidel. 

“Working walkways had to be kept clear using professional snowploughs and gritting machinery. Extra vigilance by the team was needed to ensure that tools and tool boxes were not placed where they could become buried and lost under the constant snowfall. 

“These really were extreme conditions,” Scheidel added, “but we enjoyed the challenge nonetheless.”


Got a story for Access All AreasEmail or tweet Emma Hudson
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Icy conditions for De Boer at FIS Ski Championships

De Boer’s tent builders battled minus 20°C for their first event of 2015, the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Falun, Sweden. 

The De Boer team were there to construct hospitality pavilions for Audi, Ericsson, and Vattenfall, as well as structures for dressing rooms, information points, stages for local culture demonstrations, TV studios, and other exhibitors. 

They also built a 1,600sqm pavilion that housed the special exhibition ‘Innovation We Trust’, run by Mindustry and MCI Scandinavia. 

The Championships ran from 18 February to 1 March, with exceptionally icy temperatures challenging the De Boer team. 

“Our structures had to be continually heated so that any snowfall on the roof melted, and therefore not allowed to compromise the integrity of the structure due to increased weight loading,” said De Boer’s senior site supervisor Gavin Scheidel. 

“Working walkways had to be kept clear using professional snowploughs and gritting machinery. Extra vigilance by the team was needed to ensure that tools and tool boxes were not placed where they could become buried and lost under the constant snowfall. 

“These really were extreme conditions,” Scheidel added, “but we enjoyed the challenge nonetheless.”


Got a story for Access All AreasEmail or tweet Emma Hudson
Follow us @Access_AA
Or on Facebook and Instagram