Numbers Boost For LOCOG

More than two million people watched Olympic events during the first three days of London 2012, statistics have revealed, giving a welcome boost to organisers under fire for empty seats at some venues.

Although the Games have received widespread plaudits, empty spaces at some of the venues have been a cause of frustration for organisers and for fans who missed out on tickets due to high-demand. But the figures tell a different story.

“On Saturday we had 856,000 spectators at events,” London 2012 director of communications and public affairs, Jackie Brock-Doyle, said at a press conference. “That includes football and it is using a conservative figure of half a million for the road race. That gives us an 86 per cent attendee rate. On Sunday we had 900,000, which gives us a 92 per cent attendee rate, and on Monday we had 370,000, but remember there was no football then, so that gives an attendee rate of 88 per cent.”

Brock-Doyle maintained that London 2012 will continue to work with international federations to put tickets back on sale to the public every evening on their website.

Asked if the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should have a centralised ticketing programme in place for future Games, director of communications, Mark Adams, said the organisation will continue to monitor the situation closely but will not have a full debrief until after London 2012.

Numbers Boost For LOCOG

More than two million people watched Olympic events during the first three days of London 2012, statistics have revealed, giving a welcome boost to organisers under fire for empty seats at some venues.

Although the Games have received widespread plaudits, empty spaces at some of the venues have been a cause of frustration for organisers and for fans who missed out on tickets due to high-demand. But the figures tell a different story.

“On Saturday we had 856,000 spectators at events,” London 2012 director of communications and public affairs, Jackie Brock-Doyle, said at a press conference. “That includes football and it is using a conservative figure of half a million for the road race. That gives us an 86 per cent attendee rate. On Sunday we had 900,000, which gives us a 92 per cent attendee rate, and on Monday we had 370,000, but remember there was no football then, so that gives an attendee rate of 88 per cent.”

Brock-Doyle maintained that London 2012 will continue to work with international federations to put tickets back on sale to the public every evening on their website.

Asked if the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should have a centralised ticketing programme in place for future Games, director of communications, Mark Adams, said the organisation will continue to monitor the situation closely but will not have a full debrief until after London 2012.