Suzanne Bull Awarded MBE

Attitude is Everything’s founder and chief executive, Suzanne Bull, was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List, for services to the arts and disabled people. 

Melvin Benn, managing director at Festival Republic, and Bradley Hemmings, artistic director for Greenwich + Docklands Festivals and co-artistic director for the Paralympic Games Opening Ceremony, were two among many influential colleagues that supported her nomination. 

Bull set up Attitude is Everything to challenge the music industry to improve its access for deaf and disabled customers. 

The organisation has overseen more than 70 venues and festivals signing up to a charter of best practice, thousands trained in disability equality and a huge increase in the numbers of people with disabilities accessing live music events.

“Fifteen years ago it was the same two or three [faces] on the viewing platform, nowadays you need to be at the main stage platform by 2:00pm to reserve a space,” Bull said. “The demand is there; if you build it, they will come.

“This is a great opportunity to get access to live music on the agenda again and to start pushing for more changes at a higher, political level, so I’m really excited for all of us,” she added.

“My ultimate goal is for deaf and disabled people to be able to attend, work or perform at any event that they wish. It’s a utopian view, I know, but this is genuinely because I don’t understand why there should be any barriers to this, attitudinal or physical: Music without barriers.”

 

 

 

 

Suzanne Bull Awarded MBE

Attitude is Everything’s founder and chief executive, Suzanne Bull, was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List, for services to the arts and disabled people. 

Melvin Benn, managing director at Festival Republic, and Bradley Hemmings, artistic director for Greenwich + Docklands Festivals and co-artistic director for the Paralympic Games Opening Ceremony, were two among many influential colleagues that supported her nomination. 

Bull set up Attitude is Everything to challenge the music industry to improve its access for deaf and disabled customers. 

The organisation has overseen more than 70 venues and festivals signing up to a charter of best practice, thousands trained in disability equality and a huge increase in the numbers of people with disabilities accessing live music events.

“Fifteen years ago it was the same two or three [faces] on the viewing platform, nowadays you need to be at the main stage platform by 2:00pm to reserve a space,” Bull said. “The demand is there; if you build it, they will come.

“This is a great opportunity to get access to live music on the agenda again and to start pushing for more changes at a higher, political level, so I’m really excited for all of us,” she added.

“My ultimate goal is for deaf and disabled people to be able to attend, work or perform at any event that they wish. It’s a utopian view, I know, but this is genuinely because I don’t understand why there should be any barriers to this, attitudinal or physical: Music without barriers.”