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UK festivals blackout websites against legal highs

Festivals around the UK are planning a website and social media blackout today (5 May) to spread awareness of the dangers of legal highs.
 
Legal highs, falsely considered by users to be safer than their legal counterparts, have been on a steady rise in the UK. A 2013 report from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed an 80 per cent increase in deaths from legal highs – rising from 29 to 52.
 
Put together by the Association of Independent Festivals (AIF) in collaboration with Angelus Foundation, the total online blackout will see 25 festivals – including T in the Park, Bestival, Lovebox, Global Gathering, Shambala, Secret Garden Party and Glastonbury – throw their homepages and social media pages into darkness for a day.
 
Combined, these festivals have an online reach in the millions and a physical capacity of over 700,000.
 
A grey light bulb and message reading ‘Don’t be in the dark about legal highs’ will greet visitors to the festivals’ websites.
 
AIF, which represents 50 independent festivals across the UK, has taken a firm stance against the sale of legal highs. Many of AIF’s members have banned the substances outright at their own festivals.
 
“Legal highs are a serious concern for any festival organiser and the issue is only going to get bigger,” said AIF co-founder and vice chair Ben Turner. “Banning it at our festivals is only part of the battle. We need to make fans aware of the dangers of legal highs and help them make safer choices when having fun on site.”
 
For more on the dangers of legal highs at UK festivals, pick up a copy of Access All Areas May 2014, out now.
 
Do you have news for Access All Areas? Email Emma Hudson

UK festivals blackout websites against legal highs

Festivals around the UK are planning a website and social media blackout today (5 May) to spread awareness of the dangers of legal highs.
 
Legal highs, falsely considered by users to be safer than their legal counterparts, have been on a steady rise in the UK. A 2013 report from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed an 80 per cent increase in deaths from legal highs – rising from 29 to 52.
 
Put together by the Association of Independent Festivals (AIF) in collaboration with Angelus Foundation, the total online blackout will see 25 festivals – including T in the Park, Bestival, Lovebox, Global Gathering, Shambala, Secret Garden Party and Glastonbury – throw their homepages and social media pages into darkness for a day.
 
Combined, these festivals have an online reach in the millions and a physical capacity of over 700,000.
 
A grey light bulb and message reading ‘Don’t be in the dark about legal highs’ will greet visitors to the festivals’ websites.
 
AIF, which represents 50 independent festivals across the UK, has taken a firm stance against the sale of legal highs. Many of AIF’s members have banned the substances outright at their own festivals.
 
“Legal highs are a serious concern for any festival organiser and the issue is only going to get bigger,” said AIF co-founder and vice chair Ben Turner. “Banning it at our festivals is only part of the battle. We need to make fans aware of the dangers of legal highs and help them make safer choices when having fun on site.”
 
For more on the dangers of legal highs at UK festivals, pick up a copy of Access All Areas May 2014, out now.
 
Do you have news for Access All Areas? Email Emma Hudson